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Earn rewards for your bird photos

 

Since their launch in 2012 our free weekly roundups, written by Mark Golley, Andy Stoddart and Jon Dunn, have become a very popular feature on the RBA website. A large part of their appeal to readers are the excellent photos, videos and artwork contributions made by RBA users. We have always tried hard to recognise these contributions, including banners and links to contributors websites and an individual namecheck at the end of each roundup. However we want to recognise these contributions further

So new for 2017, we are introducing a reward scheme for photo contributions to our weekly roundups. If you have a photo chosen for use in one our weekly roundups you will get free subscription time on our birdnews website and smartphone app or earn credit to spend at www.wildsounds.com.

 

How the reward scheme works

  1. Register on the RBA website. This is free and enables you to upload photos to our online bird galleries. You will also get a 3-day free trial of our online birdnews services and our app, when you register.

  2. Upload your bird photos to our galleries in time for consideration in our weekly roundups, published every Wednesday morning.

  3. If your photo(s) are chosen for publication in a roundup you will receive three days free access to our website and smartphone app or £1 credit to spend at WildSounds

So, if you get published just ten times in the course of a year it is equivalent to 30 days access to our website and app worth £19 or a £10 voucher to spend at WildSounds! Get published every week and get free access to our website and app for nearly six months!

If you've had photos published in the first two roundups of 2017 you haven't lost out, credits for these will be applied at the beginning of February.,

 

Some questions answered

When will you get your free time or vouchers?
In the first week of each month you will automatically be allocated free subscription time to our website and app earned with uploads from the previous month. If you would prefer to receive WildSounds vouchers you can request this change by emailing us.

What if you are a pager customer who already gets free access to our website and app?
You will earn credit for vouchers redeemable at WildSounds. Each week you get published = £1 credit. Once £5 credit is earned you will be emailed a voucher code which you can spend immediately on the WildSounds & Books website.

What species are included in our roundups?
As well as the very rarest birds our weekly roundups include many scarce species such as Green-winged Teal, Red-backed Shrike, Yellow-browed Warbler, Shorelark, Common Crane and many more. On this page you find a full list of all the birds we report on our news services. Species that are Mega Rarity, Rarity or Scarcity are all likely to feature in our roundups and therefore will earn you credits. However from time to time we also include more common species, eg. if it is a good county record or exceptional counts, so please upload all your bird photos to give yourself the best chance of earning credits.

 

Start earning credits for your photos now

   

 

Terms and Conditions

  • Users must register with a valid email address as all correspondence will be done via email
  • Free subscription time and vouchers are non-transferable and there are no cash alternatives.
  • WildSounds vouchers are issued in multiples of £5. If at the end of the year less than £5 credit has been earned a voucher will be raised for the amount less than £5.
  • No change will be given for unused voucher amounts.
  • Wildsounds vouchers are valid for 12 months from the date of issue

 

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